Missouri Head Coach Steve Bieser on team's success using the gameSense Pitch Recognition Program.

Missouri Head Coach Steve Bieser on team's success using the gameSense Pitch Recognition Program.

Facing a guy who's gangly, throws from the side, hides the ball well, varies their release points from one pitch to the next...

....they're no fun.

The only thing you can really do is to try slowing the game down by slowing down your feet and quieting your head.

Easier said than done. Sure but here's exactly how to do it.

How to recognize pitches quicker. Pitchers are CREATURES of habit.

How to recognize pitches quicker. Pitchers are CREATURES of habit.

Facing a guy who's gangly, throws from the side, hides the ball well, varies their release points from one pitch to the next...

....they're no fun.

The only thing you can really do is to try slowing the game down by slowing down your feet and quieting your head.

Easier said than done. Sure but here's exactly how to do it.

How to face a deceptive pitcher

Facing a guy who's gangly, throws from the side, hides the ball well, varies their release points from one pitch to the next...

....they're no fun.

The only thing you can really do is to try slowing the game down by slowing down your feet and quieting your head.

Easier said than done. Sure but here's exactly how to do it.

How To Catch Up To HIGH HEAT

If you’re having trouble catching up to the fastball, ESPECIALLY the HIGH HEAT, it’s probably because of two things.

  1. You’re not starting your load early enough. - Often times a hitter runs into trouble when they get to the point of contact too late because the'y’ve initiated their speration and stride way to late.

  2. You have too much head movement - When the head moves the eyes moves. If you wanna make 90 mph look like 85mph, slow your feet and head down. If you wanna make 90 mph look like 95 mph…speed your feed up.

Here’s what you need to be thinking about.

How to recognize the curveball.

You spend hours in the cage making sure you're driving the fastball with calmness, toughness, and focus.

You work on hitting for a little more pop.

You work on driving the ball to the opposite field.

You're ready because you put in the work.

You're confident because you feel prepared.

The game starts...

...whoops!

You're facing a guy who pitches off of his breaking pitch.

He starts at-bats off with a curve-ball.

He throws one in a 2-0 count.

3 Steps To Better Pitch Recognition.

Begin your Pitch Recognition & Vision Training w/ 30% off an annual membership here!

Many players get themselves into trouble at the plate because they’re simply not ready to hit.

They step in the batter’s box thinking, “if it’s a strike, I’m going to swing” instead “it’s going to be a strike right down the plate and I’m going to be ready”.

Hunting The Fast-Ball

Begin your Pitch Recognition & Vision Training w/ 30% off an annual membership here!

Many players get themselves into trouble at the plate because they’re simply not ready to hit.

They step in the batter’s box thinking, “if it’s a strike, I’m going to swing” instead “it’s going to be a strike right down the plate and I’m going to be ready”.

Dr. Len Zaichkowski talks about the Myths of Kids and Sports

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Youth sports in America is a 15 billion dollar industry. A lot of that money is going towards special coaching and training and participation in elite travel teams. Parents spend an enormous amount of money and time on their kids’ involvement in sports, hoping the investment will pay off in accolades, college scholarships, and even the chance to play professionally. But my guests today argue that all that special coaching you’re spending money on probably isn’t doing much to turn your kid into an superstar.

Listen to the podcast

The Ultimate Playmaker – Relying on Cognitive Development in Baseball

Mark Newman has watched a lot of baseball but he had never seen anything like this. “Over the twenty-six years, I was with the Yankees, we trained shortstops, at every level in the organization, to be there on that play,” Newman, the team’s recently retired senior vice president of player development, said in an engaging conversation. “[Derek Jeter] was. Many others weren’t. I’m not sure if he was trained any differently than the other twenty-five shortstops. His ability to pay attention, be in the moment, and respond to his environment was superior. That play’s an example of it.”

Baseball Pitch Backspin Can Play Tricks On Batters

Hitters have a lot to think about when they’re at the plate. Game situation, pitch count, pitcher tendencies and even the last few at-bats. Picking out the fast ball versus the off-speed pitch is hard enough but what if a pitcher could vary not only his speed and location but also the ball’s backspin? The visual illusion of the rising fastball depends on backspin to counteract gravitational forces during the trajectory to the plate. So, playing with different backspins would directly affect the vertical dimension of the ball flight.

Researchers at Japan’s Waseda University designed an experiment to mess with a group of pro, semi-pro and college hitters by asking them to hit pitches with varying backspins but constant speeds. Their research appeared in the Journal of Applied Biomechanics.

Lack Of Pitch Recognition Affects Swing Mechanics

If a batter is able to correctly predict the pitch type, his swing movement will be timed in unison with the pitcher’s throwing motion. Tomohisa Miyanishi and So Endo of the Graduate School of Sports Science at Japan’s Sendai University set out to actually measure the the correlation of the mirrored movements.

Visual Perception Tests Help Explain Poor Hitting By Baseball Pitchers

Do pitchers and non-pitchers all start with the same level of perceptual cognitive abilities, (i.e. the same “hardware”) and then diverge based on hours of deliberate practice (improving the “software” of the brain)?  To find out, a team of researchers at Duke University dug into a treasure trove of data on over 500 baseball players who had been tested using the Nike Sensory Station (now Senaptec) between 2010 and 2014.